Fuji HS10 ..

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4 thoughts on “Fuji HS10 ..

  1. Hi Ralph

    First of all,my english is not good because it’s not my native language,so please forgive my mistakes.

    Have been reading your blog with pleasure because is one of the few that seems to make a real and valuable effort to explain with arguments and field tests what is about fuji bridge cameras.
    I agree in all you say about Fuji and it’s strange attitude with the bridge users.
    Really annoying!

    I have my Hs10 and I’ve been so surprised when you said that this camera has the better IQ of all the hs series and you have how to prove it.

    I love my Hs10,and your words made me feel that perharps I don’t know how to use all it’s potential,specially when I prove a Hs20 long time ago and some images were noticeably better than my Hs10.
    Even so,I feel that there is something…special,to use a word,in the hs10 that I don’t know to define well, but keeps me shooting with it till today.

    Not been an exr sistem,how do you think that the hs10 could be improved in order to take “the quintessence” of it?

    I usually work in P mode, L size, 4:3, 100 iso.

    Sorry if write to much and thanks for your time.

    Like

    1. Hi Rodrigo

      I’m glad you were able to find the blog of use to you.

      When Fuji produced the HS20 they used the same optical assembly found in the HS10 but had to rework it slightly. This changed the focal maximum focal length from 720 mm in the HS10 to 660 mm in the HS20, so you lost a good deal of focal length and gained a slightly larger sensor found in the HS20.

      You also lost the Instant Zoom feature in the HS10 when they made the HS20, something I was never happy about as it was an excellent way of getting more zoom, and didn’t degrade the image.
      A lot of people said that the HS10 has a very noisy sensor and to be fair it does, but the HS20 also has just about as much noise, however the EXR processor does a better job of noise reduction in camera. It means you have to work a little harder on some images when using higher ISO’s in the HS10.

      I always liked the sharpness and clarity of the HS10 lens , it is definitely better than the HS20 and that was something I noticed early after buying the HS20.

      The shot to shot times are slower in the HS10 but can be sped up a little. Use a good class 10 SD card to start with.

      I always shot in P mode – 16:9 – Large file size as my preferred image size. It means images display correctly on most monitors, and unless you do a lot of large prints, that’s the best setting. It also means that the images are only 7 mp so they write to the card faster. If I recall correctly there was a firmware update that helped speed up the AF as well.

      Something else to check is that the Focus area is set to center. If it isn’t your focus point wont be dead center of the frame. See page 54 of the manual for that. Sometimes when they setup the cameras in the factory this isn’t always set right.

      Another really important shooting tool is the AE/AF lock button. I have mine set to AF-Lock ( see page 36 of the HS10 manual ) and regularly use this.

      The way to use AF-lock is to decide what focal length you want to work at – for example 135 mm – and don’t change the focal length. Focus on your subject or if the subject is moving ( race car or other moving target ) and decide where you wish to take the shot, track your target and shoot as it arrives in the area you want. You can do this over and over as many times as you like without having to re-focus, until you change the focal length (zoom) or switch this function off. You can tell when the lock is on. The cross hair will change , in single focus mode the outer ring of the cross hair is removed, and in continuous focus the cross hair changes to a square focus indicator.

      The method is really simple, just focus where you want to take the shot, half press the shutter to lock focus. Once you have focus, press the AE/AF Lock button ( remember to hold the shutter till you see the cross-hair change) and now you can safely shoot as long as you want at the chosen focal length and focus.

      You might find some of these settings useful as well HS10 shooting settings.

      Hopefully all this is of some benefit to you.
      Best of luck … Cheers
      Ralph.

      Like

  2. Hi Ralph:
    Thanks for your fast response!

    I knew the AE/AF lock button,but I use it quiete a few because my subjects(animal,birds) changes very fast their focus zones,as you can imagine(lol)
    Even so,your words remaind me such an useful tool,so thanks a lot!

    Now,what do you think about the lost in IQ that some people say it happens when you shoot at 8 or 6 mpixels in the fuji HS10?

    Ask you because sometime ago I started to shoot landscapes,and I always found the format that you suggest (16:9) was better in terms of IQ,than the classic 4:3.
    But,I’m not an expert,so those opinions made me hesitate..

    Besides,have other doubts about it:

    When I shoot the moon,my better results always come from L size.
    Max resolution it’s better in that case??

    BUT.. with almost any other subject, M size seems to be better,sharper and detailed,and I never apply the highest camera sharpenning,if needed I do it in post proccesing.
    So…what’s your opinion of that matter?
    Is it better to shoot in M 16:9, in M 4:3 or in L 4:3?
    I know that is a very personal look,but as I told in the first mail,you are a dependable
    person, IMHO (that’s the way to say it?) lol…

    Many thanks again!

    Like

    1. Hi Ralph:
      Thanks for your fast response!

      I knew the AE/AF lock button,but I use it quiete a few because my subjects(animal,birds) changes very fast their focus zones,as you can imagine(lol)
      Even so,your words remind me such an useful tool,so thanks a lot!

      Now,what do you think about the lost in IQ that some people say it happens when you shoot at 8 or 6 mpixels in the fuji HS10?

      Hi Rodrigo, using the HS10 in 6 or 8 megapixel modes probably doesn’t do a great deal for the IQ but will certainly help with the write times to the sd card.

      Ask you because sometime ago I started to shoot landscapes,and I always found the format that you suggest (16:9) was better in terms of IQ,than the classic 4:3.
      But,I’m not an expert,so those opinions made me hesitate..

      I prefer shooting 16:9. It matches my monitor, has more than enough image data, and speeds up the shot to shot time in camera, this is important with the HS10 and was the mode I used the most. And yes I too found the IQ appeared better in the 16:9 images.

      Besides,have other doubts about it:
      When I shoot the moon,my better results always come from L size.
      Max resolution it’s better in that case?

      Yes, use the full resolution of the sensor for Moon shots.

      BUT.. with almost any other subject, M size seems to be better,sharper and detailed,and I never apply the highest camera sharpening,if needed I do it in post processing.
      So…what’s your opinion of that matter?
      Is it better to shoot in M 16:9, in M 4:3 or in L 4:3?

      If you can I would always shoot 16:9 with he HS10, I also do this with the HS20

      I know that is a very personal look,but as I told in the first mail,you are a dependable
      person, IMHO (that’s the way to say it?) lol…

      Many thanks again!

      Cheers
      Ralph 🙂

      Like

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